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Sunday November 23, 2014

Rutgers Today

Multimedia Feature

  • Humans of RutgersU

    “It’s hard to explain what it’s like being on stage because it’s not really you. It’s like an altered state of consciousness similar to how athletes feel when they’re playing and they get in the zone with a heightened state of adrenaline.” - Celine Dirkes, First-Year Student

Top Stories

Features

  • Christopher Etienne found success at Rutgers after a troubled adolescence that led to time in prison.

  • “It’s hard to explain what it’s like being on stage because it’s not really you. It’s like an altered state of consciousness similar to how athletes feel when they’re playing and they get in the zone with a heightened state of adrenaline.” - Celine Dirkes, First-Year Student

  • Not Tonight Thumb

    A Rutgers sociologist penned a book exploring the history of migraines and the politics of gender and health.

What's Happening at Rutgers

  • Newark
    Book Reading: ‘Inside Newark’

    Civil rights leader and urban policy expert Robert Curvin reads from his book Inside Newark – Decline, Rebellion and the Search for Transformation and leads a discussion with Kenneth Jackson on the history and future of Newark December 3 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Newark. Registration required.

  • Romantic Art
    Art Exhibition

    Stedman Gallery hosts “Dark Eye Glances,” an exhibition of works with the theme of romanticism, through December 20 in Camden. 

  • Jesse Krimes
    Art Created in Prison

    The Zimmerli Art Museum exhibits works by Jesse Krimes, who was incarcerated in federal prison for 70 months, through December 14.

  • piano
    Mallery Concert Series

    The Department of Fine Arts at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences-Camden hosts its free noontime Mallery Concert series through December 3.

  • Camden Sounds
    Sounds of Camden

    Rutgers-Camden Center for the Arts presents this exhibition, which explores the city through its music, poetry and voices, now through December 18.

Fast Facts
About Rutgers

A Rutgers star was a trailblazer in the racial integration of college football.Rutgers football great and 1919 class valedictorian Paul Robeson, who later achieved worldwide fame as an actor and civil rights activist, was one of the first African Americans to be named a college football All-American.Robeson first won the award in 1917— three decades before Jackie Robinson integrated Major League Baseball.

 

Rutgers in the News