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Friday July 21, 2017

Two Rutgers Professors Named Fellows of Top National Science Association

Monday November 23, 2015

Two Rutgers Professors Named Fellows of Top National Science Association

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A marine geologist and a microbiologist are among the newest members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – Two Rutgers professors are among 347 members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) who have been elevated to the rank of fellow. The pre-eminent national organization selects its fellows based on their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

The new inductees will receive an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin Saturday, Feb. 13, at the AAAS fellows forum during the 2016 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington.

Marie-Pierre Aubry
Marie-Pierre Aubry
Marie-Pierre Aubry is a marine geologist in the School or Arts and Sciences who examines ocean floor sediments to establish intervals of geological time, measured in millions of years. Her research provides geologists with timelines that they can use to accurately date and correlate events as recorded in these sediments. Aubry looks for the presence of calcium carbonate microskeletons from single-celled organsms that originally lived close to the ocean surface. These microskeletons accumulated on the ocean floor after the organisms died. She is currently focusing on a period of time 56 million years ago when the planet became very warm for 100 to 150 thousand years, which scientists are using as an analogue model to help predict the effects of global warming.

The association cited Aubry “for distinguished contributions to Cenozoic geologic time scales as one of the world's foremost experts in calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and evolution.”

Tamar Barkay
Tamar Barkay
Tamar Barkay is a microbiologist  in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences who studies how microorganisms convert mercury in the environment into methylmercury, a potent neurotoxic substance. She discovered several ways that methylmercury forms in diverse land and water environments, and has used that knowledge to gauge the environmental and public health risks to local populations. Her research, supported by an extensive network of national and international collaborations, has taken her to remote corners of the world where microbes actively change mercury chemistry, such as in hot springs at the depths of the ocean and in the Arctic circle.

The association cited Barkay “for distinguished contributions to the field of environmental science, particularly for advancing our understanding of how microorganisms effect the fate of mercury in the environment.”

About the AAAS

AAAS logo
Founded in 1848, the AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society. It works to advance science and serve society through initiatives in science policy, international programs and science education. The tradition of selecting AAAS fellows began in 1874.

AAAS includes 254 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Its prestigious peer reviewed journal Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated readership of 1 million.


Media inquiries: Jeff Tolvin, 973-972-4501 or 908-229-3475 or jeff.tolvin@rutgers.edu

 

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